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WQAD.com

Tracking the warmest Christmas Day on record

We’re likely looking at the warmest Christmas Day in Quad Cities history tomorrow. Here’s how long the warmth will stick around.

Today's surprise 60 plus degree readings will likely pave the way for a new round of record high temperatures on Christmas Day.

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Looking back at the temperature history for Christmas Day here in the Quad Cities, it's easy to see that the majority of our days land somewhere in the 30s for high temperatures. That won't be the case this year, though, as a truly unusual early winter pattern remains locked in place keeping a south wind going.

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The current forecast for Christmas Day now calls for temperatures to reach up to 60 degrees in many locations, which would break previous record highs in the Quad Cities, Burlington, Iowa City, and Dubuque. The only limiting factor that could prevent us from reaching the 60s again on Wednesday would be more cloud cover arriving later in the morning and into the afternoon. As of now, that doesn't appear likely.

RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES FOR CHRISTMAS DAY:
Quad Cities: 59° set in 1936
Dubuque: 58° set in 1936
Iowa City: 60° set in 1893
Burlington: 61° set in 1936

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The most impressive part of this whole stretch? The fact that we are essentially doubling our normal high temperature for this time of year with the record warmth.

Looking further out into the forecast, I do see a more seasonal pattern returning to the Quad Cities by early next week that will draw temperatures back down into the 30s. While it doesn't appear we're in for any substantial cold in the immediate future, it is a sign that a more active pattern looks to arrive for the beginning of the new year that will likely yield some new snowfall for parts of the region. Remember, for the season beginning back in July, we are already in a surplus of snowfall thanks to an active October and November.

Until then, enjoy the warmth and the fairly quiet pattern that has come along with it!

Meteorologist Andrew Stutzke