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Hospitals seeing average age of COVID-19 patients drop to people in their 30s

Amy Thoreson with the Scott County Public Health Department said the average age of those becoming infected is 33 years old.

The Quad Cities COVID-19 Coalition, which is made up of a group of local health care professionals, said the average age of patients being hospitalized with COVID-19 has dropped. 

Younger people being hospitalized

Amy Thoreson with the Scott County Public Health Department said the average age of those becoming infected is 33 years old.  

Dr. Tim Olutade, the Chief Medical Officer at UnityPoint Health - Trinity, said at the end of March into early April the average age of patients being admitted to the hospital was 36, which was down from the previous average age of 60. 

The rate of people dying from COVID has dropped, noted Janet Hill, with the Rock Island County Health Department.  Although long-term effects remain a concern. 

Dr. Olutade said the virus can cause major damage to lung tissue, which down the road can turn into a respiratory illness or pneumonia. 

Rejecting vaccine doses

Thoreson mentioned that a trend her department has seen is people getting their first dose of the shot, but not returning for a second. 

"The vaccine trials that tested these vaccines only focused on the effectiveness of the vaccine after both doses," she explained. She said though some people do feel side effects after their second dose, that's not to say everyone will feel ill after getting vaccinated.  If you do feel side effects, she asked people to remember, "you're not sick, you're having an immune response."

When asked about medical professionals getting vaccinated, Dr. Olutade said medical professionals and other frontline healthcare workers should take advantage of the protections the vaccine offers.

"My plea to my fellow professionals... is to get this vaccine. I understand there is some hesitancy in some people but we have seen it work," said Dr. Olutade. "We have experienced it locally here, the number of healthcare workers that are out with this illness is almost negligible at this time."