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COVID-19 Vaccine in Illinois and Iowa: How much of my county is fully vaccinated?

Data from the Illinois Department of Public Health.
Credit: map


Illinois 

(scroll down for Iowa information)

The COVID-19 vaccine, made by Pfizer, started getting distributed to Illinois healthcare workers on Tuesday, December 15.  The first inoculations in the state were at OSF St. Francis in Peoria.

In the map below, you'll find county-by-county COVID-19 data made available by the Illinois Department of Public Health. 

» Scroll over the map to find your county. 

» Data shows how much of each county's population has been fully vaccinated. Note: "fully vaccinated" means the person has received all required doses of the vaccine

» The data also shows total case counts and total deaths reported since the start of the pandemic.

Where can I get vaccinated?

For more information on vaccine distribution, take a look at the IDPH's Mass Vaccination Planning Guide.

See more vaccination data from the Illinois Department of Public Health, here. 

RELATED: When and where can I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Iowa 

(scroll up for Illinois information)

The COVID-19 vaccine, made by Pfizer, started getting distributed across Iowa on December 14.  An ER nurse named David Conway was the first in the state to get a dose of the shot.

In the maps below, you'll find county-by-county COVID-19 data made available by the Iowa Department of Public Health. 

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Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about the vaccine:

RELATED: Vaccine 101: QC health officials host Q&A about the safety and distribution of a COVID vaccine

Is the vaccine effective? 

Both Pfizer and Moderna's vaccine trials have shown to be about 95% effective.

How long does protection last after being vaccinated?

The answer is not completely clear.

Those taking part in the Phase 3 clinical trials and the first people to get vaccinated may eventually to be able to provide the answer to that question, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University.

Epidemiologist Dr. Anthony Fauci said he would be surprised if the vaccine gave life-long immunity like the measles vaccine.

Moncef Slaoui, head of the US vaccine development effort said he believes the effectiveness could last for "many, many years," with older people and others who are more vulnerable requiring a booster shot every three-to-five years.

What about side effects of the vaccine?

According to a handout from the CDC, on the arm where you get the shot, some pain and swelling are common. They said that throughout the rest of the body, fever, chills, tiredness, and headache are not uncommon.

RELATED: As COVID-19 vaccine becomes available, these are the known side effects

They said in most cases, discomfort from fever or pain is normal. If redness or tenderness increases after 24 hours or if the side effects are worrying or do not seem to be going away after a few days, patients are advised to contact a medical professional.